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Custom Club Fitting

Shaft Flex

Understanding Shaft Flex:

"Flex" refers to the ability of a golf shaft to bend as forces are applied to it during the golf swing. These forces are generated by the type of swing that you have - fast or slow, smooth or jerky. There are five generally used ratings for shaft flex: Extra Stiff, Stiff, Regular, Senior and Ladies, usually denoted by the letters X, S, R, M and L ("M" is used for Senior because this flex stands for medium/mature). How much or how little a club's shaft flexes plays a major role in how and when the club face is squared at impact. It is important to have the proper flex for your swing speed. Without it, there's a good chance that you’ll have a hard time making good solid contact on a consistent basis, thereby affecting both the direction and distance of the golf shot.

Shaft Flex Selection (Driver)

Shaft Flex Selection (Driver)
Carry Distance Swing Speed Flex
Under 180 yards Under 75 mph Ladies
180 to 200 yards 75 to 85 mph Senior/A/M
200 to 240 yards 85 to 95 mph Regular
240 to 275 yards 95 to 110 mph Stiff/Firm
Over 275 yards Over 110 mph Tour (Extra) Stiff
Shaft Flex Selection (6 Iron Carry Distance)
Carry Distance Swing Speed Flex
Under 100 yards Under 60 mph Ladies
100 to 130 yards 60 to 70 mph Senior/A/M
130 to 155 yards 70 to 80 mph Regular
155 to 175 yards 80 to 90 mph Stiff/Firm
Over 175+ yards Over 90+ mph Tour (Extra) Stiff

Guidelines for choosing driver loft based on swing speed:

Choosing the correct loft in a driver is vital in order to produce a proper launch angle. Launch angle is the angle at which the ball leaves the clubface at impact. The launch angle is critical to maximizing distance. The optimal launch angle depends on the player’s clubhead speed and ball velocity. It ranges between 12 and 15 degrees. Typically, players with a slower swing speed will benefit from a higher lofted driver which will help get the ball in air more easily, resulting in a higher trajectory, longer carry, and more distance. Below is a reference in helping determine proper driver loft for a player.

  • 60 to 70 mph (165 yards or less) = 12-15 degrees of loft
  • 70 to 80 mph (165 to 200 yards) = 11-13 degrees of loft
  • 80 to 90 mph (200 to 240 yards) = 10-12 degrees of loft
  • 90 to 100 mph (240 to 275 yards) = 9-11 degrees of loft
  • 100 mph + (275+ yards) = 8-10 degrees of loft

Note: These figures are a starting point and will not apply to every player.

Shaft Kick Point

Shaft Kick Point, also known as flex point or bend point, is the location on the shaft that bends the most during a swing. A higher kick point, which means the bend point is higher in the shaft, closer to the grip, can help lower trajectory, while a lower kick point, which is closer to where the head and shaft are connected can help increase the trajectory of a golf shot. Players with slower clubhead speeds typically benefit from a lower kick point, which helps to get the ball in the air more easily, resulting in a higher trajectory, longer carry, and greater distance. Players with higher clubhead speeds typically benefit most from shafts with a higher kick point, which promotes a lower launch angle for a lower, more controllable trajectory. The difference in high and low kick points is generally only about 2 inches. Try to get shafts that have a kick point somewhere in the mid range, unless you really need to try and affect the trajectory of your shots. A majority of OEM (Original Equipment Manufacturers) stock shafts have mid kick points, as this type shaft will fit a larger majority of players.

Spin-Rate

Besides launch angle, another crucial variable that needs to be managed is spin-rate. Spin-rate is defined as the rate at which the speed of a golf ball spins on an axis while in flight and is measured in revolutions per minute (rpm). This spin, in combination with a golf balls dimples, is what causes a golf ball to stay aloft. Players that generate high initial ball speed need to combine a higher launch angle with a lower spin-rate, while players that produce lower initial ball speeds need to combine a higher launch angle with a higher spin-rate, which keeps the ball in the air longer to produce greater carry and distance. The optimal spin-rate varies depending on a player’s ball speed and swing speed. This is typically between 2500 to 3300 rpm, although there are exceptions.

New Modern Standard Club Length & Loft Chart

Irons
Clubhead Traditional Pre 1975-80 Modern 1980-95 90's & 2000+
#1 17 16 15
#2 20 19 18
#3 24 22 20
#4 28 25 23
#5 32 28 26
#6 36 32 30
#7 40 36 34
#8 44 40 38
#9 48 44 42
PW 52 48 46
SW 55 55 55
AW, GW N/A 52 50 & 52
UW N/A 60 60
Woods
Clubhead Traditional Pre 1975-80 Modern 1980-95 90's & 2000+
Driver 10-11 9 & 11 12 or less
#3 16 15 15 or less
#5 22 20 17.5 - 19
#7 N/A 25 21-24
Men’s New Modern Standard Length
Club Graphite Steel Ladies
Driver 45-46" N/A 44-45"
3 wood 43" 42.5" 42"
5 wood 42.5" 42" 41.5"
7 wood 42" 41.5" 41"
Utility #3 (graphite) 40.5" 40" 39"
Utility #4 (graphite) 40" 39.5" 38.5"
Utility #5 (graphite) 39.5" 39" 38"
Utility #6 (graphite) 39" 38.5" 37.5"
3 iron 39" 38.75" 38"
4 iron 38.5" 38.25" 37.5"
5 iron 38" 37.75" 37"
6 iron 37.5" 37.25" 36.5"
7 iron 37" 36.75" 36"
8 iron 36.5" 36.25" 35.5"
9 iron 36" 35.75" 35"
PW 35.5" 35.5" 34.5"
GW 35.5" 35.5" 34.5"
SW 35.25" 35.25" 34.25"
LW 35" 35" 34"
Note: All OEM’s are different on their standard length and loft. These figures are an average.

Help determine proper club length for irons (Static Measurement)

The goal of proper club length is to allow a player to assume an athletic address position. A very tall player will stoop too much with a standard-length club, while a very short player will stand too upright. Proper shaft length can significantly influence the direction, consistency and distance of a golf shot by forcing the player into an address position that can be maintained throughout the golf swing.

Height Wrist to Floor Measurement Recommended Club Length
> 6'8" > 42" +2"
6"6" - 6"8" 41" - 42" +1.5"
6"4" - 6'6" 40" - 41" +1"
6'2" - 6'4" 38.5" - 40" +.5"
6'1" - 6'2" 37" - 38.5" +.25"
5'7" - 6'1" 34" - 37" Standard
5'4" - 5'7" 32" - 34" -.25"
5'2" - 5'4" 29" - 34" -.5"
5" - 5'2" 27" - 29" -1"
4'10" - 5' 25" - 27" -1.5"
< 4'10" < 25" -2"

What is Lie angle and what Lie angle do I need?

The lie angle of a club is the angle formed by the sole of the club and the shaft. This angle affects the position of the club head at address and impact. Proper lie will cause the center of the club head to strike the ground (good) rather than the heel or toe (bad).

Lie Angle Variations:

A club which is too upright for the golfer will hit the ground with the heel of the club, causing the clubface to close and resulting in a pull or hook (for right-handed players.) A club which is too flat will hit the ground with the toe of the club causing the clubface to open and resulting in a push or slice (for right-handed players.)

Help determine proper lie angle for irons (Static Measurement)

Your Height

  4'10" to 5'6" 5'6" to 6'2" 6'2" to 6'7"
40"     3 degrees up
39.5"   3 degrees up 3 degrees up
39' 3 degrees up 3 degrees up 2 degrees up
38.5" 3 degrees up 2 degrees up 2 degrees up
38' 2 degrees up 2 degrees up 2 degrees up
37.5" 2 degrees up 2 degrees up 1 degrees up
37" 2 degrees up 1 degrees up 1 degrees up
36.5" 1 degrees up 1 degrees up 1 degrees up
36" 1 degrees up 1 degrees up standard lie
35.5" 1 degrees up standard lie standard lie
35" standard lie standard lie standard lie
34.5" standard lie standard lie standard lie
34" standard lie standard lie standard lie
33.5" standard lie standard lie standard lie
33" standard lie standard lie 1 degrees flat
32.5" standard lie 1 degrees flat 1 degrees flat
32" 1 degrees flat 1 degrees flat 1 degrees flat
31.5" 1 degrees flat 1 degrees flat 2 degrees flat
31" 1 degrees flat 2 degrees flat 2 degrees flat
30.5" 2 degrees flat 2 degrees flat 2 degrees flat
30" 2 degrees flat 2 degrees flat 3 degrees flat
29.5" 2 degrees flat 3 degrees flat 3 degrees flat
29" 3 degrees flat 3 degrees flat  
28.5" 3 degrees flat    

Help choosing proper club length and lie

Research indicates that lie angle is most effectively measured dynamically. It can be generalized that taller players require a more upright lie angle and shorter players a flatter lie angle. However, other variables affect impact lie angle such as the player’s address posture and how his/her hands are positioned at address and impact, either high or low. Therefore, a suitable lie angle cannot always be prescribed based on the player’s static (height and wrist-to-floor) measurement. Another good rule of thumb when deciding on proper club length is every ½" added to the standard length of a club will in return make the club play 1* more upright. Every 1/2" subtracted will in return make the club play 1* flatter.

In order to achieve the most accurate club fitting, players should be fitted using both static and dynamic measurements. There is a direct correlation to the direction of the golf ball flight and the ability to swing consistently without compensations on the swing. To have accurate and correct measurements, you will need to have someone other than you gather the information. Lie angles listed are intended to be a reference chart only. Professional custom club fitting is needed and recommended to determine exact and correct length & lie.